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Contacting the Congress

Latest Update to Contact Information:
October 15, 2014

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Miscellaneous Internet Resources Related to the Federal Government

This page lists lots of Internet-based resources for getting information on Congress and the rest of the Federal Government. This is just a quick summary of those resources. The Federal Government maintains a site called FirstGov which is supposed to help citizens navigate the huge number of government web sites. I highly suggest you start your search there if this page doesn't contain what you are looking for.

This page is divided into the following sections:

Sites related to the U.S. Senate

Sites related to the U.S. House of Representatives

Other Governmental Sites

"Non-Partisan" Sites

[Seal of the U.S. Senate]The United States Senate

The United States Senate has members which are elected to six year terms by voters from the entire state. There are two Senators per state. In any given election year, roughly one third of Senators are up for re-election. The following services on the Internet are related to the Senate:

Committees of the Senate:
The Senate committee structure includes Standing Committees (which generally have legislative jurisdiction) and Select, Special, Other, and Joint Committees (which are chiefly for oversight or housekeeping tasks). Full Senate Committee and Subcommittee information is available on the Committees and Subcommittees page.

Senate Leadership
A quick look at the Senate Leadership will reveal that the leadership is divided by political party. This is also evident in the existence of the following committees and conferences WWW homepages:

Senate Schedule and Activities
Keeping track of what is going on in the Senate is important if you are planning when you need to contact your Senators. Here are some sites that can help you track down which committees are discussing what matters...

[Seal of the U.S. House]The United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives has members which are elected to two year terms by voters of "district" within a state. The number of districts a state has (and thus the number of Representatives in the House) is determined by it's population, with an absolute minimum of one Representative per state. All members of the House of Representative are up for election every election year. The House also has non-voting "delegates" from territories of the United States (Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). The following services on the Internet are related to the House of Representatives:

Committees of the House of Representatives:
Like the Senate, the House's lawmaking efforts are very complex, so the work gets broken up into committees and subcommittees. Complete contact information for all House Committees and Subcommittees is available on the Committees and Subcommittees page.

House of Representatives Leadership
Again, like the Senate, the House Leadership from the two major parties have set up some partisan committees. They offer the following partisan pages on there computers:

House Schedule and Activities
Keeping track of what is going on in the House is important if you are planning when you need to contact your Representative. Here are some sites that can help you track down which committees are discussing what matters...

Other Governmental Sites on the Internet

Along with services directly related to the U.S. Senate or House of Representatives, there are other online services offered by the United States Government or related to it that can be helpful in allowing your to be an informed constituent and voter.

Legislative Branch:

Judicial Branch:

Executive Branch:

Other Government Agencies

"Non-Partisan" Sites with Congressional Information

There are also several other online services designed to help you be a more informed constituent and voter. I have assembled a list of some of those services here, making an effort to use only non-partisan services.

Voting Histories/Recent Activities of Congressmembers:

Other Sites With Contact Information for Congressmembers:

  • FirstGov: The Federal Government attempt to keep track of its own websites.
  • Government Resources on the Web: Put together by Grace York at the U Michigan Documents Center, this site is a very, very complete listing of Government information available on the Net. Use it to find almost anything about anybody or any agency in the U.S. Government and some Foreign ones.

Sites specializing in Political News:

  • Roll Call is "the newspaper of Capitol Hill since 1955." They offer news from the Hill everyday, usually in a long, more detailed format than available in your standard newspaper.
  • The Hill: "The Capitol Newspaper" provides weekly in-depth stories on the activities of the denizens of Capitol Hill.
  • C-SPAN WWW Homepage: The first major television network dedicated solely to covering Politics.

State-level Government Information:

Miscellaneous but Interesting Sites Related To Federal Politics:

  • U. S. Founding Documents: Contains copies of the Original U.S. Constitution and U.S. Declaration of Independence and other Founding documents for the United States in almost every format imaginable.

Last Updated: Friday, October 24, 2014 12:55:31 CDT

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